In 1957, the American Bar Association instituted Law Day to draw awareness to both the principles and practices of law and justice.  President Dwight D. Eisenhower later established Law Day with a proclamation in 1958. 

Law Day is a national celebration in honor of the rule of law and its contributions to the freedoms that Americans enjoy. 


Through the support of The Friends and other contributors, the Library of Congress holds an annual Law Day program.  Law Day is free of charge and open to the public.


Law Day 2017: "Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustrations"

Online Exhibition

"Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustrations"

  • April 27–October 28, 2017
  • 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • South Gallery, Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building

 

Law Day 2017 was designed to coordinate with the opening of the exhibit, “Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustrations.”  The exhibit features drawings from 12 courtroom artists over a 50 year span of time. 

The exhibition, ongoing through October 28, 2017, showcases the Library’s extensive collections of original art by talented artists hired by both newspapers and television to capture the personal dynamics of legal trials. 

On Thursday, April 27, 2017 the Law Library of Congress also marked Law Day with a panel discussion about courtroom illustration, “Justice Through the Perspective of an Eyewitness Artist.”  Law Librarian Jane Sanchez introduced courtroom artists Marilyn Church, Pat Lopez and Bill Robles along with Library of Congress Prints & Photographs curator Sara W. Duke, who moderated the discussion.  The event was held at noon in Room 119 on the first level of the Library Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  


Law Day 2016

Paulette Brown, president of the American Bar Association with Law Librarian of Congress Roberta I. Shaffer. Photo by Shawn Miller.

Paulette Brown, president of the American Bar Association with Law Librarian of Congress Roberta I. Shaffer. Photo by Shawn Miller.

50th Anniversary of Miranda v. Arizona

In celebration of Law Day 2016, the Law Library of Congress marked the 50th anniversary of the United States Supreme Court decision, Miranda v. Arizona 384 U.S. 436 (1996).  Law Librarian of Congress Roberta I. Shaffer interviewed Paulette Brown, President of the American Bar Association regarding her distinguished career, as well as the significance of Miranda v. Arizona.

The Law Library acknowledged Thomson Reuters and The Friends for support of this program.


Other Previous Events

Richard Dreyfuss Law Day.png

Richard Dreyfuss: Revitalizing Civics Education in America's Schools

In recognition of Law Day 2012, the Library of Congress hosted actor Richard Dreyfuss for a discussion focused on the Dreyfuss Initiative, a non-profit organization that aims to revitalize civics education in public schools.

For the past several years, Dreyfuss has been traveling the nation advocating the teaching of civics and the restoration of civil debate in America.

Richard Dreyfuss, who has starred on stage and screen for nearly five decades in works ranging from the comedic to Shakespeare, has also spent four years studying (2004- 2008) at St. Antony's College at Oxford University.